본문 바로가기
HOME> 저널/프로시딩 > 저널/프로시딩 검색상세

저널/프로시딩 상세정보

권호별목차 / 소장처보기

H : 소장처정보

T : 목차정보

Austral ecology 13건

  1. [해외논문]   Flammability dynamics in the Australian Alps   SCI SCIE

    Zylstra, Philip John (School of Biological Sciences, University of Wollongong, Northfields Ave, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia)
    Austral ecology v.43 no.5 ,pp. 578 - 591 , 2018 , 1442-9985 ,

    초록

    Abstract Forests of the Australian Alps (SE Australia) are considered some of the most vulnerable to climate change in the country, with ecosystem collapse considered likely for some due to frequent fire. It is not yet known, however, whether increasing fire frequency may stabilize due to reductions in flammability related to reduced time for fuel accumulation, show no trend, or increase due to positive feedbacks related to vegetation changes. To determine what these trends have been historically, dynamics were measured for 58 years of mapped fire history. The 1.4 million ha forested area was divided into broad formations based on structure and dominant canopy trees, and dynamics were measured for each using flammability ratio, a modification of probability of ignition at a point. Crown fire likelihood was measured for each formation, based on satellite‐derived measurements of the 2003 fire effects across a large part of the area. Contrary to popular perception but consistent with mechanistic expectations, all forests exhibited pronounced positive feedbacks. The strongest response was observed in tall, wet forests dominated by Ash‐type eucalypts, where, despite a short period of low flammability following fire, post‐disturbance stands have been more than eight times as likely to burn than have mature stands. The weakest feedbacks occurred in open forest, although post‐disturbance forests were still 1.5 times as likely to burn as mature forests. Apart from low, dry open woodland where there was insufficient data to detect a trend, all forests were most likely to experience crown fire during their period of regeneration. The implications of this are significant for the Alps, as increasing fire frequency has the potential to accelerate by producing an increasingly flammable landscape. These effects may be semi‐permanent in tall, wet forest, where frequent fire promotes ecosystem collapse into either the more flammable open forest formation, or to heathland.

    원문보기

    원문보기
    무료다운로드 유료다운로드

    회원님의 원문열람 권한에 따라 열람이 불가능 할 수 있으며 권한이 없는 경우 해당 사이트의 정책에 따라 회원가입 및 유료구매가 필요할 수 있습니다.이동하는 사이트에서의 모든 정보이용은 NDSL과 무관합니다.

    NDSL에서는 해당 원문을 복사서비스하고 있습니다. 아래의 원문복사신청 또는 장바구니담기를 통하여 원문복사서비스 이용이 가능합니다.

    이미지

    Fig. 1 이미지
  2. [해외논문]   Not such silly sausages: Evidence suggests northern quolls exhibit aversion to toads after training with toad sausages   SCI SCIE

    Indigo, Naomi (School of Life Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123 Broadway, Sydney, New South Wales, 2007, Australia) , Smith, James (Australian Wildlife Conservancy, Mornington Wildlife Sanctuary, Derby, Western Australia, Australia) , Webb, Jonathan K. (School of Life Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123 Broadway, Sydney, New South Wales, 2007, Australia) , Phillips, Ben (School of Biosciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia)
    Austral ecology v.43 no.5 ,pp. 592 - 601 , 2018 , 1442-9985 ,

    초록

    Abstract The invasion of toxic cane toads ( Rhinella marina ) is a major threat to northern quolls ( Dasyurus hallucatus ) which are poisoned when they attack this novel prey item. Quolls are now endangered as a consequence of the toad invasion. Conditioned taste aversion can be used to train individual quolls to avoid toads, but we currently lack a training technique that can be used at a landscape scale to buffer entire populations from toad impact. Broad‐scale deployment requires a bait that can be used for training, but there is no guarantee that such a bait will ultimately elicit aversion to toads. Here, we test a manufactured bait – a ‘toad sausage’ – in a small captive trial, for its ability to elicit aversion to toads in northern quolls. To do this, we exposed one group of quolls to a toad sausage and another to a control sausage and compared the quolls' predatory responses when presented with a dead adult toad. Captive quolls that consumed a single toad sausage showed a reduced interest in cane toads, interacting with them for less than half the time of their untrained counterparts and showing reduced Attack behaviour. We also quantified bait uptake in the field, by both quolls and non‐target species. These field trials showed that wild quolls were the most frequent species attracted to the baits, and that approx. 61% of quolls consumed toad‐aversion baits when first encountered. Between 40% and 68% of these animals developed aversion to further bait consumption. Our results suggest that toad‐aversion sausages may be used to train wild quolls to avoid cane toads. This opens the possibility for broad‐scale quoll training with toad aversion sausages: a technique that may allow wildlife managers to prevent quoll extinctions at a landscape scale.

    원문보기

    원문보기
    무료다운로드 유료다운로드

    회원님의 원문열람 권한에 따라 열람이 불가능 할 수 있으며 권한이 없는 경우 해당 사이트의 정책에 따라 회원가입 및 유료구매가 필요할 수 있습니다.이동하는 사이트에서의 모든 정보이용은 NDSL과 무관합니다.

    NDSL에서는 해당 원문을 복사서비스하고 있습니다. 아래의 원문복사신청 또는 장바구니담기를 통하여 원문복사서비스 이용이 가능합니다.

    이미지

    Fig. 1 이미지
  3. [해외논문]   Declining populations in one of the last refuges for threatened mammal species in northern Australia   SCI SCIE

    Davies, Hugh F. (Quantitative and Applied Ecology Group, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, 3010, Australia) , McCarthy, Michael A. (Quantitative and Applied Ecology Group, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, 3010, Australia) , Firth, Ronald S. C. (Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University, Casuarina, Northern Territory, Australia) , Woinarski, John C. Z. (NESP Threatened Species Recovery Hub, Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University, Casuarina, Northern Territory, Australia) , Gillespie, Graeme R. (Flora and Fauna Division, Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Northern Territory Government, Berrimah, Northern Territory, Australia) , Andersen, Alan N. (NESP Threatened Species Recovery Hub, Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University, Casuarina, Northern Territory, Aust) , Rioli, Willie , Puruntatameri, José , , Roberts, Willie , Kerinaiua, Colin , Kerinauia, Vivian , Womatakimi, Kim Brooks , Murphy, Brett P.
    Austral ecology v.43 no.5 ,pp. 602 - 612 , 2018 , 1442-9985 ,

    초록

    Abstract Australia has contributed a disproportionate number of the world's mammal extinctions over the past 200 years, with the greatest loss of species occurring through the continent's southern and central arid regions. Many taxonomically and ecologically similar species are now undergoing widespread decline across the northern Australian mainland, possibly driven by predation by feral cats and changed fire regimes. Here, we report marked recent declines of native mammal species in one of Australia's few remaining areas that support an intact mammal assemblage, Melville Island, the largest island off the northern Australian coast. We have previously reported a marked decline on Melville Island of the threatened brush‐tailed rabbit‐rat ( Conilurus penicillatus ) over the period 2000–2015, linked to predation by feral cats. We now report a 62% reduction in small mammal trap‐success and a 36% reduction in site‐level species richness over this period. There was a decrease in trap‐success of 90% for the northern brown bandicoot ( Isoodon macrourus ), 64% for the brush‐tailed rabbit‐rat and 63% for the black‐footed tree‐rat ( Mesembriomys gouldii ), but no decline for the common brushtail possum ( Trichosurus vulpecula ). These results suggest that populations of native mammals on Melville Island are exhibiting similar patterns of decline to those recorded in Kakadu National Park two decades earlier, and across the northern Australian mainland more generally. Without the implementation of effective management actions, these species are likely to be lost from one of their last remaining strongholds, threatening to increase Australia's already disproportionate contribution to global mammal extinctions.

    원문보기

    원문보기
    무료다운로드 유료다운로드

    회원님의 원문열람 권한에 따라 열람이 불가능 할 수 있으며 권한이 없는 경우 해당 사이트의 정책에 따라 회원가입 및 유료구매가 필요할 수 있습니다.이동하는 사이트에서의 모든 정보이용은 NDSL과 무관합니다.

    NDSL에서는 해당 원문을 복사서비스하고 있습니다. 아래의 원문복사신청 또는 장바구니담기를 통하여 원문복사서비스 이용이 가능합니다.

    이미지

    Fig. 1 이미지

논문관련 이미지